Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Hot air, poached cod and art

Yesterday the chimney people came, blew out the dryer vent, inspected the chimney, pronounced all was well, emptied my wallet and left.

Followed up by a couple of neighbors wanting to know how I'd found them, how to contact, etc.  Written clearly on the van, but they'd missed it! 

It pays to do business in a development, because people are happier to hire someone who's already been seen around than an unknown Google search.  They certainly earned their money yesterday, climbing on the roof in torrid heat, even early morning. 

Here's what explains the feeling the heat 


And this explains my swollen and itchy eyes


And this is why I've been coughing for days, smell of woodsmoke around this week.

And there's this


All in all, we've had better days.

Meanwhile there was cod to poach, and carrots and dandelion greens to steam, and capers to strew around.


And apricots to finish, with nutritious chocolate almonds.

Outside, when it was cooler in the evening, I did a bit of spotting, a little fungus, balsam flowers self seeded, and other self starting plants 




In other wildlife news, I was filling my rinsing water bowl for daily dishes last night, when I spotted a little clump being swept around the bowl by the hot water. 

I fished it out and found it was a little spider, waterlogged and half drowned. I tried to dry her out a bit without damaging any legs, then maneuvered her onto a paper towel. 

This morning she's gone, so I guess she lived to fight another day. Us spinners have to stick together, through hell and hot water.

Textiles and Tea featured a wonderful Japanese scholar, artist, painter, artisan in shibori dyeing, ikat weaving and boro, the preservation of tatters.



She spoke of this cultural museum in Basel, Switzerland, as a repository of fiber culture from many regions and centuries.


Boro is the preservation and respect for tattered, patched cloth, showing its history and place in the culture.

She wrote the classic English language book on shibori dyeing, before then the texts were in Japanese.






She believes in keeping a flexible mind, letting the materials suggest the next move, and not grimly holding onto the first design idea.  It was an education to listen to her. Check her website for more.

Last evening I finished the next page in my fabric book. Mary will recognize the original fabric, but maybe not its current form 


and yes, the fabric suggested each move, tearing, raveling stitching. I just followed her lead.

Happy day everyone, hang in there, despite climate and political setbacks, we, with nature and art, will survive and thrive.





28 comments:

  1. Oh yes, word of mouth is absolutely the best way to find quality tradespeople and repair people!

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    1. These chimney people bought the business from my previous trusted owners, who retired. They assured me they'd gone to a lot of trouble to sell to good people!

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  2. It's good nothing needed repair. I've been surprised by all the methods of weaving. I never would have guessed. Your heat is worse than ours, but we are heading that way this weekend.

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    1. Stay cool! I think we're hotter than the tropics!

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  3. I'm due for a chimney sweep this summer at the like before we start using the fireplace again in the fall. I love the weavng photos.

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  4. I saw the news about that bridge! It was carried on our national news. We had poached cod too yesterday. So easy to cook, mere minutes.

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    1. Yes, the cod is a few minutes in the poaching liquid, doesn't heat up the kitchen. Also it's good food.

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  5. You are having a very hot summer. It's typical summer temps here, which are hot enough. It's raining today (again), the effect of the hurricane down south.

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    1. We do get heat like this in July. Just not as much of it at a stretch

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  6. People providing a service have to provide it, no matter what the weather. Many's the time I've seen a gardener mowing grass in pouring rain, for example.

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    1. I disagree. I was willing to postpone. It was about 120°f in the roof, life threatening heat. But they had set mine as the first stop of the day and they wanted to complete.

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  7. That's a pretty piece of fabric you're stitching on, Liz. Love the color. I hope you're managing to keep cool!

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  8. Funny that Textiles and Tea talked about boro stitching because I've seen several mentions of it lately. I like the textures of the fabric you're working with in your fabric book - something that requires touching to get the full benefit.

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    1. Yes, you need to handle this kind of work. Boro is big right now.

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  9. In spite of the cost it must be good to tick that job off yesterday.
    Spinners sticking together. Very funny.

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    1. Yes, getting these things done feels good. I have a fellow feeling with spiders!

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  10. It's been many years since I had to engage the chimney fellows. It used to be about $200 a year for two chimneys, one of which had a wood stove that heated a big room six or seven months a year. Glad I'm not doing it now.

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    1. One of those recurring safety expenses. I only do it when they catch me, since I don't use the fireplace.

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  11. Good grief you are as hot as Florida. Good for you for getting this done!

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  12. Yoshiko Wada sounds like a woman after your own heart. I love the phrase “preservation of tatters.” The heat and air quality sound awful, and the swelling of the 3rd Avenue Bridge is astounding.

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    1. That's a lovely compliment. Maybe I can get to be her when I grow up.
      I thought you'd notice the bridge news. I bet you know the bridge.

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  13. Where did my comment go? Oh well. You know what I was going to say- I love what you're doing with that little scrap of fabric that whispered, "Send me! Send me!"

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    1. She was right! I've checked spam, nothing. But blogger's doing weird changes and little dances at the moment.

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  14. I thought that you had already closed up your fireplace - do you still have to get the chimney inspected every year? I love those preserved tatters. It encourages me to keep adding bits to my well worn boiler suit - maybe it will see me out after all

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    1. That was the fireplace at the other property. Once sealed it's impossible to inspect the chimney. This is the townhouse where I live. Cheaper to leave the chimney unsealed. Also I like my insert in the fireplace, mock flames, cheerful.

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