Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A trip down memory lane!

This blogger. a writer and hillwalker, lives almost exactly where I did as a little kid, and in recent correspondence I mentioned that I climbed Roseberry Topping, local sort of mountain there, when I was three, with a lot of help. He promptly put it on his list of hillwalks to do soon, and here it is:

http://becausetheyrethere.com/2014/10/22/a-cooks-tour-of-the-cleveland-hills/

So take the tour.  That sweep of fields across to the hills with the Monument always in view, is permanently embedded in my memory, shows up all the time in my art even when I didn't plan it, and I have a watercolor of a similar scene, one I painted many years ago from memory, one of the earliest pieces I exhibited, at my teacher's urging.

I just ran up to take a quick pic of it, awkwardly from the side to avoid glare, and because it's halfway up my stairwell, can't step back from it, and here's a view, for once without the Monument!


5 comments:

Ash said...

Wow! What a lovely country side. Thank you for sharing both the artwork and the virtual hike.

dogonart said...

Amazing. So many years since we were there and it still looks the same. I always loved those views from Easby Hill (the monument).

Boud said...

Glad you liked it! and if you go to the map at the end of his post, and use control plus your mouse wheel to enlarge it, you'll find Gribdale Terrace! squee!

Minimiss said...

What beautiful photos in the blog post and a small thing to tie thee to me - Teeside and James Cook. He is very well known, of course, in our part of the world and I especially like the portrait of him shown in the blog.

I love your watercolour too. Those clouds are to die for. No wonder your teacher wanted you to exhibit it.

Quinn said...

What a lovely landscape, and isn't it nifty that your blog-friend is right there to document and share it! Great pictures, delightful narrative. (Although the part about the fellows eating the dead man's sandwiches did surprise me - just not something that would have occurred to me, I think!)
The landscapes of childhood do remain firmly in our minds' eye, don't they? I vividly recall specific trees, as well. But to be able to paint them - such a gift! I love your watercolor. It's doubly amazing to me that you could create such a painting from a landscape in your mind. Really. Brilliant.